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Faculty News Recap in the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities – Dec. 1, 2018-Jan. 31, 2019

February 3, 2019

ART – Work by Daniel Bare is on display in “Drip,” a nationally juried ceramic art exhibition at the Morean Art Center for Clay in St. Petersburg, Florida. The exhibition celebrates the ceramic glaze drip and the beauty of glaze over ceramic form.

CITY PLANNING AND REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT – Robert Benedict was named the 2018 recipient of the March of Dimes Real Estate and Economic Development Award. The award was presented at the organization’s annual luncheon, which raised more than $133,000 in  support for the Greenville Hospital System’s Neonatal Care Unit. When Benedict was recognized for his leadership in Upstate South Carolina, it was noted that the Clemson MRED program and its alumni are major contributors to communities in the Carolinas and the field of real estate development. Benedict will serve as chairman and host of the 2019 March of Dimes event.

HISTORY – Vernon Burton’s essay “The Creation and Destruction of the Fourteenth Amendment During the Long Civil War” was published in the Louisiana Law Review, Vol. 79 (Fall 2018): pp. 189-239. His book review of Steven Hahn’s “A Nation Without Borders: The United States and Its World in an Age of Civil Wars appeared in December 2018 in H-Net Reviews in the Humanities & Social Sciences. On Dec. 1 Burton was one of the leaders of a workshop for secondary school teachers on how to teach about the History of Race Relations, as part of the “Lincoln’s Unfinished Work” conference he organized and hosted. During the four-day event with more than 40 speakers, he also spoke on the topic of “Taking History to Court.”

HISTORY – Professor Emerita Elizabeth Carney’s chapter “Royal Women as Succession Advocates” was published in the book “Ancient Macedonians in the Greek and Roman Sources,” edited by Frances Pownall and Tim Howe (Classical Press of Wales).

LANGUAGES – Jody H. Cripps served as editor-in-chief of the Society for American Sign Language Journal, which released its second volume. He presented his article from the journal “Stuttering-Like Behaviors in American Sign Language” at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association convention in Boston. Cripps published another article, “Exploring Signed Language Pathology: A Case Study of Professionals Working With Deaf Students Who Have Delay/Disorders in Signed Language Development,” in conjunction with his undergraduate student who was doing a research study at a residential school for the deaf on the topic of signed language pathology.

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION – Steven Grosby’s chapter “The Philosophical Anthropology of Edward Shils” was published in the volume “The Calling of Social Thought: Rediscovering the work of Edward Shils,” edited by Christoper Adair-Toteff and Stephen Turner (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2019), pp. 32-46.

ENGLISH – Walt Hunter published a book, “Forms of a World: Contemporary Poetry and the Making of Globalization” (Fordham University Press). A piece Hunter wrote for The Atlantic about the poem on the Statue of Liberty was awarded honorable mention for “Best American History Reads of 2018” by the editor of Bunk, a history website.

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION –  Elizabeth Jemison presented a paper, “Christian Citizenship in Black and White in the Post-Emancipation South,” at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Church History, held Jan. 3-6 in Chicago.

ARCHITECTURE – Anjali Joseph, David Allison and the other researchers from the Center for Health Facilities Design and Testing (CHFD+T) at Clemson worked with the clinicians from Medical University of South Carolina from Dec. 12-13 to evaluate the functionality of a high fidelity OR mock-up constructed at the Clemson Design Center in Charleston. Highly realistic simulations were conducted for pediatric and orthopedic surgeries, where surgical teams performed tasks as they would during a live surgery. Researchers evaluated the performance of the OR during these simulations to identify design and operational challenges.

ARCHITECTURE – Professor Emeritus Yuji Kishimoto is highlighted in the American Institute of Architects digital magazine as a Featured Member.

ENGLISH – Michael LeMahieu’s “The Civil War in the Age of Civil Rights” was published in “Timelines of American Literature,” edited by Cody Marrs and Christopher Hager (Johns Hopkins University Press). LeMahieu gave two talks at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, one to its English department and another to the Sweetland Center for Writing. He was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowship for the 2019-20 academic year.

ENGLISH – Melissa Edmundson Makala published the edited collection Avenging Angels: Ghost Stories by Victorian Women Writers” with Victorian Secrets Publishing, based in Brighton in the United Kingdom. Her chapter, “Buyer Beware: Haunted Objects in the Supernatural Tales of Margery Lawrence,” also appeared in “The Female Fantastic: Gendering the Supernatural in the 1890s and 1920s” (Routledge).

HISTORY – Edwin Moise published an article, “Tet in the News,” in the February 2019 issue of Vietnam magazine.

ENGLISH – Angela Naimou presented her work at the Human Rights Futures conference hosted by the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice at Sheffield Hallam University in the United Kingdom. She also presented work at the Modern Language Association (MLA) 2019 Convention held Jan. 3-6 in Chicago.

LANGUAGES – On Jan. 14, Salvador Oropesa and Lee Ferrell presented the characteristics and nuances of the Clemson Language and International Trade program to students of the MA Seminar of Culture and Identity led by Professor Wilfried Dreyer at the Ostbayerische Technische Hochschule in Regensburg, state of Bavaria in Germany.

ENGLISH – Mike Pulley had two poems – “The Fifties” and “Out of Place”– appear in the December 2018 issue (#56) of Another Chicago Magazine, a literary journal known for publishing leading experimental and politically progressive writers. An autobiographical poem, “The Fifties” focuses on Pulley’s ancestors in Laurens, South Carolina, and their involvement with the Ku Klux Klan during the civil rights era.

CITY PLANNING AND REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT – Elora Raymond published the article “Millennial First-Time Homebuyers and Location Choice” with co-authors Jessica Dill and Yongsung Lee in the Journal of Planning Education and Research. Their research also was covered in the City Lab blog. “From Foreclosure to Eviction: Housing Insecurity in Corporate-Owned Single-Family Rentals” also appeared in Cityscape 20 (3), pp. 159-188. Raymond also contributed a book review to the Journal of Planning Education and Research on “The Geopolitics of Real Estate,” edited by Dallas Rogers.

PERFORMING ARTS – Shannon Robert is currently designing scenery for Paul Grellong’s new play, “Power of Sail,” directed by Jackson Gay. The play will have its world premiere March 15 at The Warehouse Theatre in Greenville.

LANGUAGES – Kumiko Saito appeared on “Writing Dystopia Now,” a radio program in The Cultural Frontline series on BBC World Service. On the Dec. 9 broadcast, she spoke about cyberpunk and Japanese popular culture. The program is available on demand. Saito presented her paper “Mapping the History of the Future: Politics of Enlightenment in Translated Works of Science Fiction in Meiji Era Japan” on Jan. 20 at the Southeast Regional Conference of the Association for Asian Studies in Memphis, Tennessee.

PERFORMING ARTS – Kerrie Seymour spent much of January directing Tennessee Williams’ “The Glass Menagerie” at The Warehouse Theatre. The production runs through Feb. 10.

PERFORMING ARTS – In his capacity as president-elect of the College Band Directors National Association (CBDNA), Mark Spede, Director of Bands, was invited to participate in “Carolina/CMS Summit 2.0,” an experiential workshop on designing relevant, thriving 21st-century music programs. The workshop took place Jan.17-20 in Columbia, South Carolina.

ENGLISH – Rhondda Robinson Thomas was one of the presenters for “The Scholar in the World: Supporting the Public-Facing Humanities in Our Departments and Colleges,” a workshop/discussion sponsored by the MLA Office of the Executive Director at MLA 2019. The session featured Whiting Foundation Public Engagement Fellows and Seed Grantees briefly discussing their projects and then developing recommendations for evaluating and rewarding public-facing humanities scholarship with the audience.

LANGUAGES – Eric Touya published an article, “Le poète et le philosophe: Bonnefoy, Badiou, et l’avenir de la poésie,” in Revue européenne de recherches sur la poésieNo. 4. Paris: Classiques Garnier, and a book chapter titled “Teaching Hélé Béji, Post-Colonialism, and the Arab Spring: Perspectives From Baudrillard, McClintock, Giroux” in “Rethinking the French Classroom: New Approaches to Teaching Contemporary French and Francophone Women,” edited by E. Nicole Meyer and Joyce Johnston (Routledge, New York).

ENGLISH – Spencer Tricker was awarded the Melville Society’s annual Hennig Cohen Prize for the best article, book chapter, or essay in a book about Herman Melville. His essay, “‘Five Dusky Phantoms’: Gothic Form and Cosmopolitan Shipwreck in Melville’s ‘Moby-Dick,’” was published in 2017 in the journal Studies in American Fiction. The Melville Society’s award committee stated that the essay “richly complicates the continuing inquiry into Melville’s literary engagement with racialization and imperialism” and, more broadly, “recontextualizes race across the Pacific.” The award was presented on Jan. 4 at the MLA Convention.

ENGLISH– Jillian Weise presented on cyborg poetics at the MLA 2019 Convention. Granta commended Weise’s essay, “Common Cyborg,” for being one of the Top 5 Most Read Articles in the literary magazine during 2018Granta commissioned and published an additional essay by Weise.

ART – Artwork by Valerie Zimany and Todd Anderson is featured in “Contemplative,” a small group exhibition at Kai Lin Art Gallery in Atlanta. The show runs from Jan. 11-March 1. A panel discussion by the artists is scheduled for 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9.



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