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PUBLISHED: Effects of individual differences in working memory on performance and trust with various degrees of automation

November 21, 2016

Our latest article “Effects of individual differences in working memory on performance and trust with various degrees of automation” has been published on Taylor & Francis Online. It is available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1463922X.2016.1252806.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies showed performance benefits with correct automation, but performance costs when the automation was incorrect (i.e. provided an incorrect course of action), particularly as degrees of automation increased. Automation researchers have examined individual differences, but have not investigated the relationship between working memory and performance with various degrees of automation that is both correct and incorrect. In the current study, working memory ability interacted with automation reliability and degree of automation. Higher degrees of correct automation helped performance while higher degrees of incorrect automation worsened performance, especially for those with lower working memory. Lower working memory was also associated with more trust in automation. Results illustrate the interaction between degree of automation and individual differences in working memory on performance with automation that is correct and automation that fails.



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